History-Memory-Folklore

REPORT OF CAPTAIN WILLIAM FARQUAR,
Commanding “Mounted Hoosiers,” 6th Regiment Indiana Legion:



Headquarters Mounted Hoosiers, 6th Reg. Ind. Leg.,

Corydon, August 15,1863.


Colonel Lewis Jordan, Commanding:

Sir:—In obedience to a request from headquarters, I hereby append a precise report of men and arms captured in the recent engagement with John H. Morgan during his raid in Indiana, from the time of his crossing at Brandenburg, until the surrender of Corydon, July 9, 1863.

Being at Mauckport when the information was received that a large rebel force were attempting a crossing at Brandenburg, I immediately repaired to Corydon, and notified my company to report at Corydon forthwith.

I summoned what men were nearest at hand, and immediately proceeded to the scene of action—being on duty about one hour and a half, my men all detailed as couriers. I was ordered to Mauckport, to rally all the men at that place; but failing, I was ordered, with one or two, to reconnoiter. Soon finding myself, however, in close proximity with the enemy, began a speedy retreat. Being under a cross fire of the enemy, my horse became unmanageable, and ran slightly against a tree, which entirely disabled me; whereupon First Lieutenant De Moss assumed command of the company. They were on duty all night, skirmishing with the enemy, and made several very narrow escapes.

On the morning of the 9th, the Orderly was ordered to hold such of the company as were not on duty to be ready for any emergency. Information being received that the enemy were advancing, he was ordered out to meet and skirmish with them. Coming up with Major Pfrimmer, at Glenn’s residence, the cavalry were formed for a charge. Soon the enemy came in sight, and, with drawn sabres [sic], a charge was ordered, which resulted in the loss to the enemy of one man killed, and two prisoners.

The enemy being reinforced, we were oblied [sic] to fall back slowly and reluctantly, disputing every step, until we reached headquarters— formed there on the right of the line, exposed to the enemy’s shells. Our arms being of insufficient range, we were compelled to retire— but in good order.


Pursued by a superior force, we retreated to the Pilot Knob, and there maintained our position until the surrender of the town, with the loss of eleven captured, as follows, viz:

 Serg. Henry Grable

John Swarts

Lorenzo Shuck

William H. Hottell

George Rudy

Peter McLaren

John De Moss

John Overton

Francis M. Bline

Henry Read

James Meyer

LOSS OF ARMS.

Twenty-three sets, including the loss of fourteen horses, valued as follows, viz:

Sergeant Painter

1 mare

$150.00

John De Moss

1 mare

$125.00

F. M. Bline

1 mare

$135.00

J. J. Overton

1 mare

$150.00

W. H. Hudle

1 mare

$135.00

H. Matson

1 mare

$120.00

A. A. Wright

1 mare

$85.00

James Mayers

1 mare

$125.00

Francis Frovel

1 mare

$110.00

George D. Bean

1 mare

$115.00

George Charles

1 mare

$120.00

John V. Stevens

1 mare

$150.00

W. H. Read

1 mare

$150.00

Henry Read

1 mare

$150.00

Captain William Farquar

1 mare

$150.00

Total value of horses lost while in service, $1,970.00

We would once more suggest, in addition to the requisition that has already been made, the propriety of furnishing us with arms worthy of this branch of the service, as those that we get are hard— a great many of which are of no use, the locks being out of order.

I would further state that I have not yet recovered from the shock I received whilst on my retreat, near Brandenburg.

I should have reported sooner but for the wound received. I have been part of the time unable.



WILLIAM FARQUAR,
Capt. Mounted Hoosiers, 6th Reg. Ind. Leg.



[Note: Published Legion report shows name incorrectly as “William Forquor.”]